Compounding

The Art of Personalized Medication

 

What is compounding?

 

Pharmacy compounding is the art and science of preparing customized medications for you, based on your doctor's orders. The practice of compounding dates back to the origins of pharmacy. Modern technology, innovative techniques and research have allowed pharmacists to customize medications to meet your specific needs.

 

How can compounding benefit me?


• When needed medications are discontinued 

 

• When you are allergic to preservatives, dyes or binders 

 

• When your treatment requires tailored dosage strengths 

 

• When several medications needs to be combined to increase compliance

 

• When pills cannot be swollowed, medication can be formulated into cream, liquid or other form

 

• When standard treatments fail and an alternative is needed

 

 

Unique Medication Delivery for Your Unique Needs.

(Scoll over each picture for more information)

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Topical Preparations
Topical Preparations

Topical methods of delivery are widely used because they allow the absorption of medicine directly through the skin, and may help avoid potential side effects such as stomach upset or drowsiness.

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Oral Liquids
Oral Liquids

Many medications can be compounded as oral liquids for those patients who have difficulty swallowing tablets and capsules. Some medications may be available as effervescent powders, which are mixed with water to make a fizzy drink.

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Custom Flavoring
Custom Flavoring

Custom flavoring is available for most oral dosage forms, and unique delivery systems may be employed to help give medication to finicky patients.

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Capsules
Capsules

Medication can be compounded into customized capsules, especially in cases where an alternate strength is required or to omit potential allergens or irritants. Multiple medications can often be combined into a single dose or made into sustained-release capsules.

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Troches/Lollipops
Troches/Lollipops

Troches and lollipops are used to keep drugs in the mouth if local action is needed there. Troches also may be placed under the tongue and allowed to dissolve, which allows the medication to enter the bloodstream quickly. Some troches can be chewed and swallowed by a patient who cannot take a capsule.

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Suppositories
Suppositories

Patients who cannot take medications orally are ideal candidates for suppositories. Available in various shapes depending on the route of administration, suppositories can be given rectally, vaginally or urethrally. By melting or dissolving into the body cavity, they pass quickly into the bloodstream.

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